(E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis


  • Paperback
  • 152
  • An Experiment in Criticism
  • C.S. Lewis
  • English
  • 07 May 2019
  • 9780521422819

C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters

An Experiment in Criticism Read & Download â 4 Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis Terature is a commitment to laying aside expectations and values extraneous to the work in order to approach it with an open min. But in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myselfCS Lewis An Experiment in Criticism p141 Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom fully realise the enormous extension of our being which we owe to authors We realise it best when we talk with an unliterary friend He may be full of goodness and good sense but he inhabits a tiny world In it we should be suffocated The man who is contented to be only himself and therefore less a self is in prison p140

Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis

An Experiment in Criticism

An Experiment in Criticism Read & Download â 4 Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis Why do we read literature and how do we judge it CS Lewis's classic analysis springs from the conviction that literature exists. Another good example as to why it s a shame CS Lewis has been largely abandoned to the realm of religious studies I can t imagine many non religious literary critics would bother touching this now In a lot of ways this is a proto text for Reader Response theory with Lewis exploring why making a distinction between what is good literature and what is bad literature is less important than analyzing the person reading it which he breaks into the literary and unliterary Of course the whole thing comes off now as inescapably antiuated particularly in the way he has no problems making clean cut categorizations but around every corner he comes up with unexpected surprises often laced with a devilishly dry British wit a spirited defense of Modernist poetry for instance or perhaps a shrewd dissection of literary fashions dethronments and restorations of literary reputations are almost monthly eventsBut the penultimate chapter The Experiment is the most striking of all particularly in his cautioning against Vigilant criticism which I take as being social theory which was just beginnings its rise to ascendency around the time this was published Frankly it reminded me a lot of what Camille Paglia had to say in her infamous Junk Bonds and Corporate Raiders Academe in the Hour of the Wolf what an interesting pair those two make Not that I agree wholeheartedly with Lewis or Paglia on this topic though I do find it intriguing and on many levels valuable as well Unfortunately Lewis self consciously refuses to carry his point to the logical extreme and that s I suppose where Paglia went for better or worse instead choosing to conclude his experiment in a swirl of invoked transcendence But lest we be uick to write Lewis off as too esoteric for these postmodern times not even a day after remarking to a friend I was finding this book rather old fashioned Lewis administered a potent bitchslap writing all you can really say about my taste is that it is old fashioned yours will soon be the same Touch We can only find a book bad by reading it as if it might after all be very good We must empty our lives and lay ourselves open There is no work in which holes can t be picked no work that can succeed without a preliminary act of good will on the part of the reader

review An Experiment in Criticism

An Experiment in Criticism Read & Download â 4 Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis For the joy of the reader and that books should be judged by the kind of reading they invite Crucial to his notion of judging li. Praise for the book Here s a long list of all of the references to other works See Plodcast Episode 24 great books are the books that the people you admire read Related poem by PiperSee some explanatory notes here Chs 1 3 Chs 4 6 Chs 7 8 Chs 9 EpilogueI haven t worked it all out yet but there s some overlap in some of Lewis s earlier essays all in On Stories On Juvenile Tastes 1958 Different Tastes in Literature 1946 and On Criticism 1960s unfinishedCh 1 The Few and the ManyLiterary criticism is about judging books and any judgment about readers is something that follows the initial book judgment Lewis wants to reverse that and see what happens judge books based on other readers practicesLiking X and having a taste for X are different activities early on somefew literary people liked good literature many others liked school readings and leisure readings Lewis says the liking was a different kind of liking CSL gets into the differences1 the few read books they like over and over the many read books they like once CSL s reference to women isn t sexist he s talking about his experience and his world hadn t made the euality shift yet2 the few see reading as a priority the many see reading as something to do as a last resort3 the few read books that often lead to momentous experiences on the level of religious experiences they are significantly changed the many don t have those kinds of experiences4 the few think and talk about what they ve read the many don t muchThe few treat reading as a main ingredient in life the many treat reading as marginal The few and the many don t like in the sameunivocal wayLewis will focus on literature but this principle applies to other fine arts music paintings see Ch 3 and natural nature beauty landscape as a criterion for vacation as opposed to the luxury hotel or golf course Ironic and infuriating that the many find attention to artnature to be affectationDiscussion about whether Lewis s distinction between the few and the many was a good one Too black and white True to experience We found that while Lewis sounds elitist in Ch 1 he calms our concerns in Ch 2Ch 2 False CharacterisationsThat one group is few and one group is many is an accident a generalization with many exceptionsLewis does not mean many in a sense of rabble Certainly the many in Lewis s framework include intelligent moral wise people and the few include those who are ignorant and dishonorableOther defects of his diagram two kinds of readers the groups are porous some few join the many and vice versa people are on different levels for different areasWhat s not surprising is that non literary people have trivial responses to literature what is surprisingdisappointing is that people whose job is to be literary sometimes have trivial responses to literature they are mere professionals whose original love has been dulled publish or perish professors or those whose job it is to review books uicklyStory of a snub from a colleague who didn t want to talk about literature after hoursBoth economic necessity and overwork and ambition and combativeness destroy appreciationThe few academicsStatus seekers are also not part of the few Some are born into families where knowing culture is expected the small vulgar who are part of the many but the only real literary one among them might be a young boy reading Treasure Island under the bedcovers 7 Status seekers are dominated by fashionDevotees of culture read for improvement Cf the difference between someone who exercises mercenary and someone who plays soccer for funMaking English an academic subject exposed it to literary Puritans who use literature to gain merit CSL avoids serious because of its puritanical connotation grave solemn although he thinks there s a good connotation too vigorous that allows for frivolityplayReaders should receive literature in the same spirit that the authors wrote it written playfully read playfully Mature isn t great either because it assumes that one reuires lots of experiencediscipline although some experiencediscipline is reuired The few and the many as categories apply to childrenLots of the few have passed over from the manyCh 3 How the Few and the Many use Pictures and MusicThe artwork of PotterRackham varies in uality but CSL didn t notice as a child He looked at pictures as representations of what he really wanted to think about the pics were substitutes for the real thing and he didn t appreciate them as artwork he looked at what the picture was of not what it wasThe many never outgrow this They appreciate art for its narrative ualities and even appreciation of skill is mostly attention to realism not consideration of lines etc The many use pictures but are not open receptive to themThat method using things as a means to something else is what we use for icons and toysWe need negative action being receptive before the positive action evaluation The first demand any work of art makes upon us is surrender Look Listen Receive Get yourself out of the way 19The many use art and the few receive it 19Issue of obedienceordersCSL believes that while it s possible to use good art poorly it s impossible to enjoy bad art with a full and disciplined reception 20 receptive passiveuneducatedNo one really enjoys bad art for its own sake but people might enjoy the effects of the bad art eg porn Thus bad taste if it means liking bad art for its own sake doesn t exist 21When pictures are used only for the ideas one finds behind them a person will call out of himself only what is already there nothing new 21Transition to music twofold response as one attends only to the tune 1 socialorganic joining in 2 emotional not all emotional responses to music are appropriate to the music emotional responses are not universal Eastern Europeans don t react negatively to minor keys and the titles of musical works can influence our emotionsIt is using music not appreciating it as such to enjoy only the ideas evoked by it CSL clarifies that using pictures or music in this way is understandable and not necessarily bad 23 24The few sometimes respond organically and emotionally but they go further they wait and attend cf Look and Listen and look to see what happens to the tuneSuch using is rushed and tries to do something to the art as opposed to waiting and letting the art do something to you again using art isn t necessarily reprehensible but there s that is available in a full human experienceGreat point about how some young people cf sophos go through a phase in which they think that if something has an immediate appeal it must be cheap But obviously a comfortable house is not necessarily bad architecture there may be to it than just comfort For status seekers and devotees of culture Ch 2 this phase is not transient but rather a fixationCh 4 The Reading of the UnliteraryWhile it s easier to contrast the few pure music appreciation and the many listening through the music for music listeners it s harder to talk about use with literature since everyone uses words in the sense that we don t love words for themselves we are interested in what words signify we go through and beyond themPace MacLeish Words have to mean though we ll skip the debate about whether or not poems have to mean Carroll s boojumThe task at hand is to discover what the literary parallel to the many who listen to music by focusing on the tune and ignoring the rest Lewis says we can look at five characteristics of readers behaviors 281 exclusive focus on narrative ie the news or nonfiction a class above might read fiction2 no ears for ugly or beautiful wordslanguage think of academic jargon3 unconscious of style4 prefer minimal dialogue prefer action5 prefer action packed narrativeThe common source of these characteristics is the Event 30 sounds tune words EventLewis ties 1 2 4 and 5 to the Event then spends time on 3 style Judgments on style are not instantaneous they reuire the intermediate step of judging the wordsphrases If we can imagine what the words describe we assume the the style is good Milton if we can t we assume the style is bad ScottYou have to really give the book a shot full attention to know if it s good or bad that s paying the author a perhaps undeserved compliment Unliterary readers don t give full attentionUnliterary readers want the statement or event to be immediately recognizable Good writing is an item that he doesn t want and full attention is a price he doesn t want to pay 32 33The unliterary prefers writing that is neither too full reuires too much attention nor too spare reuires too much imaginationFor the unliterary clich s books backdrop plays not terribly important but would be missed if absentStyle mongers judge books by arbitrary rules often related to grammar or vocabulary They don t pay attention to sound or significance Dryden Such readers are anti literary analogy to obscenity laws which could easily be circumvented by avoiding the write words and still be obscene and as teachers they make others hate good writing which often breaks certain rules3 types of Events that the unliterary enjoy 1 exciting vicarious anxiety sensations of fear 2 answered uestions mysteries 3 vicarious pleasurehappinessdelight It is not wrong to enjoy these things but the unliterary have no other ways of enjoying literature 38Ch 5 On MythLewis wants to avoid the misapprehension that a myth lover who dismisses bad literary versions of the myth yet latches onto the myth itself is doing the same thing as an unliterary person who is interested only in the Event see pp 45 49A myth is a kind of story that has an extra literary value in itself there s something satisfactory and inevitable about mythsGreek muthos simply means story CSL isn t necessarily referring to what anthropologists deem to be myths some anthropological myths do not rise to the level of great myth plus LOTR countsLewis sees six characteristics of myths 43 44 1 extra literary not just plot details 2 seems inevitable and produces contemplation 3 low level of reader sympathy for individual characters 4 fantasticimpossible 5 graveserious 6 awe inspiringCSL is describing myths as we encounterread them not accounting for their originWhile the myth lover appreciates myth not necessarily for its literary ualities although some myths such as the prose Edda are written well he is not the same as the unliterary person who wants only the Event 46The myth lover is moved by the mythical Event and will be forever the unliterary are momentarily excited and then they forget foreverBuchan may write better than Haggard but Haggard s work is mythical with Buchan an unliterary reader may wonder if the hero will escape with Haggard a myth lover will be captured by the story foreverNot every literary person likes myth but no unliterary person likes myth 49Fantasy and defining termsCh 6 The Meanings of FantasyLiterary fantasy impossiblespreternaturals vs psychological fantasy three kinds1 mistaking a pleasing imaginative construction for reality delusion2 a consuming pleasing imaginative construction no delusion but still injurious Morbid Castle building3 2 but in moderation and duly subordinated to effective and outgoing activities could lead to reality Normal Castle building3a Egoistic Normal Castle building self centered dreamer is always the hero3b Disinterested Normal Castle building dreamer isn t the hero and might not be in the dreamChildren often take Disinterested Normal Castle building further and imagine playing in that world constructioninventionfictionIt s possible to transition from Egoistic NC b to Disinterested NC b to literary invention Trollope did thisWhen unliterary folks enjoy vicarious pleasures through characters it is guided or conducted egoistic castle building these experiences supply material for egoistic day dreaming 53 All readers project themselves into stories to some degree empathy and we shouldn t rashly assume that all unliterary readers always do this comic books and horror storiesReaders of the lowest class unliterary egoistic NC b don t expand themselves when they read it s confirmation and indulgenceIt was important to distinguish between different kinds of fantasies because those who engage in Egoistic NC b psychological fantasy do not like literary fantasyThey re limited to realistic books they demand strict observance of natural laws because their impoverished imaginations have a strong inertia they can t get past the unreality of literary fantasy and they wish their often unrealistic stories eg with preposterous coincidences were realtrue Even if their dreams are unrealized they want them to be realizable which is impossible with literary fantasy rendering it pointlessSee the rest of the review here


10 thoughts on “(E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

  1. says: (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters If you're into stuff like this you can read the full reviewCultural Chicken Soup for the SoulAn Experiment in Criticism by C S LewisLi

  2. says: Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis This is partially a review and partially a reflection I expect on my second reading to expand on the review part of it but for now it

  3. says: (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters Another good example as to why it's a shame CS Lewis has been largely abandoned to the realm of religious studies I can't imagine many non religious literary critics would bother touching this now In a lot of ways this is a proto text for Reader Response theory with Lewis exploring why making a distinction between what is good literature and what is bad literature is less important than analyzing the person

  4. says: review An Experiment in Criticism (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters

    (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters Praise for the book Here's a long list of all of the references to other works See Plodcast Episode #24 great books are the books that the people you admire read Related poem by PiperSee some explanatory notes here Chs 1–3 Chs 4–6 Chs 7–8 Chs 9–EpilogueI haven't worked it all out yet but there's some overlap in some of Lewis's earlier essays all in On Stories On Juvenile Tastes 1958 Different Tastes in Literature

  5. says: review An Experiment in Criticism C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis I read this to read along with the Literary Life Podcast They finished ages ago but I finished today I really think the Epilogue helped me understand the whole better but I suppose that's because I read Madeleine L'Engle w

  6. says: (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis If you haven't read anything on literary criticism this little book by CS Lewis will open your mind to a whole new world the world of the text and it well read Lewis suggests that rather than judging the uality of books by

  7. says: (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis I have always loved Lewis for his Children’s books but this book gave me a new appreciation for his brilliance Such a fascinating discussion of what exactly is good literature how we should read it and how it interacts with us Literature is art No wonder I love reading so much

  8. says: review An Experiment in Criticism C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis But in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myselfCS Lewis 'An Experiment in Criticism' p141 Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom fully realise the enormous extension of our being which we owe t

  9. says: review An Experiment in Criticism (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    review An Experiment in Criticism (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis An Experiment in Criticism is a fun little book CS Lewis tries to answer the uestion leading critics struggle with all the time what makes gr

  10. says: review An Experiment in Criticism C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis

    Summary × PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ C.S. Lewis C.S. Lewis ↠ 4 characters (E–pub New) [An Experiment in Criticism] author C.S. Lewis This is a thought provoking book that I'm pretty sure I don't fully understand yet and I probably am going to re read this again in a month to fully get it There were a lot of good lines from this book that struck me and several sections I'm probably going to start using in the English classes I teach Probably going to be

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