[E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present


  • Paperback
  • 472
  • Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present
  • Christopher I. Beckwith
  • English
  • 08 March 2019
  • 9780691150345

Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download

Download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present E invasions by Persians Greeks Arabs Chinese and others In retelling the story of the Old World from the perspective of Central Eurasia Beckwith provides a new understanding of the internal and external dynamics of the Central Eurasian states and shows how their people repeatedly revolutionized Eurasian civilization Beckwith recounts the Indo Europeans' migration out of Central Eurasia their mixture with local peoples and the resulting development of the Graeco Roman Persian Indian and Chinese civilizations; he details the basis for the thriv. Late last year I picked this book up as it looked very interestingAnd it is I highly recommend it as an extremely well done history of a part of the world that most people just don t know about from pre history to the current dateBut this book is not for the faint of heart If you want some light informative reading you will find the book overwhelmingThis especially holds true in the prologue and first two chapters of the book where the footnotes and endnote references fly thick and furious With all the flipping back and forth and integrating the three different bits of text together it can take over a uarter hour to get through two pagesThe reason for this is that for the early parts of the book Beckwith is an expert holding forth on the obscure parts of his field of expertise He is well aware that almost everything he has to talk about hinges on specialized knowledge and the footnotes and endnotes contain clarifications and when he argues against the conventional interpretation the general line of logic that leads to his conclusionThat said he does make some assumptions of knowledge If you don t know about linguistic reconstruction and I m lucky that I ve run across it before you ll be wondering just what he s talking about at many points and what all those stars in front of words mean which is a symbol for deduced but not attested form of a word As it is many of the notes and all of Appendix B go pretty heavily into the field and there are pronunciation glyphs I ve never seen beforeSpeaking of Appendixes there are two of them to go with voluminous endnotes a Prologue and a Epilogue Appendix B goes into the reconstruction of the names of various peoples from Chinese sources working out likely earlier forms of the names and where those names can be euated with names in non Chinese sources Appendix A goes into his reconstruction of the initial diaspora of the Indo European people and the initial branching off of Proto Indo European into daughter families I recommend reading it before Chapter 1 and Appendix B before Chapter 2 as they are heavily referenced in those sections The Prologue is concerned with the First Story which is a story cycle common to many Indo European cultures including the Romans as a herofoundation myth The Epilogue is about the concept of barbarians and how the modern conception of such is not only inappropriate to an understanding of the peoples of Central Eurasia as he takes pains to point out during the book but is inappropriate to an understanding of the original term and some of original sources but is especially inappropriate to use with Chinese sources where several different terms for foreigner that have little or no pejorative implications are usually translated into English as a kind of barbarian The main part of the book is a history of Central Eurasia or properly the Central Eurasian Culture Complex This history is delineated by broad cultural borders that change over time not geographical onesI have to admit that there are large sections of the book where I am an unarmed man against some of his assertions In general I think his construction of pre and early history are sound but I don t know enough to raise many objections My main problem is that he seems to be a bit too strong of a Diffusionist for my tastes asserting that the chariot was only invented by the Indo Europeans and allowed them to impose themselves on the various peripheral culturesThe bulk of his book spends some time pointing the importance of trade and the fact it is generally the peripheral civilizations that try to restrict trade and the Central Eurasian civilizations often attack with the stated demand of opening up trade again The Age of Exploration is looked in the light of one trade system the Silk Road being replaced by another the Littoral System with the current backwardness of the area resulting from the collapse of trade in the areaThe last couple chapters turn into a screed against Modernism Again I m largely mentally unarmed against his assertions but I judge he paints with entirely too broad a brush He sees Modernism not just as a new movement that overthrew previous traditions but as a movement that relies on overthrowing the old and therefore has led intellectual life down the blind alley of continual revolution without trying to move forward with the results of any of those revolutions He then ties that into to efforts of Modernist regimes to destroy the cultural past as examples the Soviet efforts to destroy religious community and the Taliban s destruction of Buddhist monuments in AfghanistanAgain I do highly recommend the book I have some potential problems with it but it is far important than those problems I would certainly like to hear from people who can talk to my concerns better than I can but in the end it s biases are fairly clear and the value of a history that ties together the events of such a large area ranks very high also the bulk of the most interesting points of the book have not been touched on by me here Finally the notes do a valuable service in pointing out places where further scholarly study are desperately needed and I hope that some of these gaps are directly addressed in the future Nee Naw Real Life Dispatches From Ambulance Control year I picked this book up as it looked very interestingAnd it is I highly recommend it as an extremely well done history of a part of the world that most people just don t know about from pre history to the current dateBut this book is not for the faint of heart If Hide and Seek you want some light informative reading A Mothers Duty you will find the book overwhelmingThis especially holds true in the prologue and first two chapters of the book where the footnotes and endnote references fly thick and furious With all the flipping back and forth and integrating the three different bits of text together it can take over a uarter hour to get through two pagesThe reason for this is that for the early parts of the book Beckwith is an expert holding forth on the obscure parts of his field of expertise He is well aware that almost everything he has to talk about hinges on specialized knowledge and the footnotes and endnotes contain clarifications and when he argues against the conventional interpretation the general line of logic that leads to his conclusionThat said he does make some assumptions of knowledge If Disney Tangled you don t know about linguistic reconstruction and I m lucky that I ve run across it before The Soprano you ll be wondering just what he s talking about at many points and what all those stars in front of words mean which is a symbol for deduced but not attested form of a word As it is many of the notes and all of Appendix B go pretty heavily into the field and there are pronunciation glyphs I ve never seen beforeSpeaking of Appendixes there are two of them to go with voluminous endnotes a Prologue and a Epilogue Appendix B goes into the reconstruction of the names of various peoples from Chinese sources working out likely earlier forms of the names and where those names can be euated with names in non Chinese sources Appendix A goes into his reconstruction of the initial diaspora of the Indo European people and the initial branching off of Proto Indo European into daughter families I recommend reading it before Chapter 1 and Appendix B before Chapter 2 as they are heavily referenced in those sections The Prologue is concerned with the First Story which is a story cycle common to many Indo European cultures including the Romans as a herofoundation myth The Epilogue is about the concept of barbarians and how the modern conception of such is not only inappropriate to an understanding of the peoples of Central Eurasia as he takes pains to point out during the book but is inappropriate to an understanding of the original term and some of original sources but is especially inappropriate to use with Chinese sources where several different terms for foreigner that have little or no pejorative implications are usually translated into English as a kind of barbarian The main part of the book is a history of Central Eurasia or properly the Central Eurasian Culture Complex This history is delineated by broad cultural borders that change over time not geographical onesI have to admit that there are large sections of the book where I am an unarmed man against some of his assertions In general I think his construction of pre and early history are sound but I don t know enough to raise many objections My main problem is that he seems to be a bit too strong of a Diffusionist for my tastes asserting that the chariot was only invented by the Indo Europeans and allowed them to impose themselves on the various peripheral culturesThe bulk of his book spends some time pointing the importance of trade and the fact it is generally the peripheral civilizations that try to restrict trade and the Central Eurasian civilizations often attack with the stated demand of opening up trade again The Age of Exploration is looked in the light of one trade system the Silk Road being replaced by another the Littoral System with the current backwardness of the area resulting from the collapse of trade in the areaThe last couple chapters turn into a screed against Modernism Again I m largely mentally unarmed against his assertions but I judge he paints with entirely too broad a brush He sees Modernism not just as a new movement that overthrew previous traditions but as a movement that relies on overthrowing the old and therefore has led intellectual life down the blind alley of continual revolution without trying to move forward with the results of any of those revolutions He then ties that into to efforts of Modernist regimes to destroy the cultural past as examples the Soviet efforts to destroy religious community and the Taliban s destruction of Buddhist monuments in AfghanistanAgain I do highly recommend the book I have some potential problems with it but it is far important than those problems I would certainly like to hear from people who can talk to my concerns better than I can but in the end it s biases are fairly clear and the value of a history that ties together the events of such a large area ranks very high also the bulk of the most interesting points of the book have not been touched on by me here Finally the notes do a valuable service in pointing out places where further scholarly study are desperately needed and I hope that some of these gaps are directly addressed in the future

Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. BeckwithEmpires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

Download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present The first complete history of Central Eurasia from ancient times to the present day Empires of the Silk Road represents a fundamental rethinking of the origins history and significance of this major world region Christopher Beckwith describes the rise and fall of the great Central Eurasian empires including those of the Scythians Attila the Hun the Turks and Tibetans and Genghis Khan and the Mongols In addition he explains why the heartland of Central Eurasia led the world economically scientifically and artistically for many centuries despit. A physical map of most of Eurasia This book is simply enormous in scope And so unhappily is this damn review For that reason portions of the review are labeled as spoiler to be opened by the really curious In Empires of the Silk Road A History of Central Eurasia From the Bronze Age to the Present 2009 Christopher I Beckwith provides a kind of history of most of the region represented by the above map from the Bronze Age to the present This impossible task is made barely manageable by his intent to make two main points 1 what he calls the Central Eurasian Culture Complex CECC has informed most of the cultures in that enormous region during that span of time and 2 the Central Asian and northern steppe peoples blithely called barbarians by the peoples of the peripheral empires Greek Roman Chinese Arab British Russian were anything but barbarians For Beckwith they were the victims of the expansionary and imperialist fervor of the peripheral empires Indeed he asserts that modern culture does not derive from the Tigris Euphrates Nile Indus and Yellow River valleys but from the CECC So though this book is stuffed full of historical information mostly linguistic and textual but also some archaeological about the peoples in that great expanse of time and space the material is generally selected to explain and support Beckwith s primary aims What Beckwith calls Central Eurasia is whatever area at any given moment of time is under the influence of the CECC This region has therefore expanded and contracted in time but at its largest extent according to Beckwith it included basically everything in temperate Eurasia from Britain to Japan The CECC is that complex of cultural traits identified with the carriers of the original Proto Indo European languages which includes such things as a comitatus and war chariots and the associated burials warfare carried out primarily by archers on chariots and later on horses certain types of heroic origin myths religious beliefs focused on a Sky God and an Earth Goddess before conversion to one of the world religions and the Indo European languages themselves Beckwith clearly holds that the Central Asian and northern steppe peoples were the purest representatives of the CECC in historical times Like S Frederick Starr in his excellent Lost Enlightenment Central Asia s Golden Age From the Arab Conuest to Tamerlane though with enormously expanded scope Beckwith s polemical intent is to argue against the pejorative views of Central Asian cultures held by historians of and in the peripheral empires This point they both make very convincingly but since Starr is not so temporally and spatially inclusive he is able to draw a detailed portrait of the cultural and economic significance of the Central Asian peoples Unfortunately since the late 17th century they were sueezed and then swallowed by the Russian Manchu Chinese and British Empires and reduced to their current sad state when the latter energetically developed maritime trade and then clamped down their inner Asian borders thereby starving out the economies of Central Asia with natural conseuences for their high culture Beckwith expresses the hope that yet another Central Asian revival there have been uite a few over the millennia is in the offing In the process of setting up his Big Picture of the peoples of the CECC Beckwith overturns much of accepted Proto Indo European theory Curious to see how his colleagues reacted I read a review of this book in the Journal of Indo European Studies in which an expert lambasts much of Beckwith s linguistic theory So despite his tone of at times nearly supercilious confidence there is speculation in this text that will be threshed out over time by other specialists not by me Nonetheless the main points are well made and accepted in their essentials in the mentioned review the assertions about facts and uotes are backed up by detailed footnotes and a very extensive bibliography and the book underwent a searching peer review in order to be published by the Princeton University Press So despite the gleeful air of overturning the applecart Beckwith sometimes adopts at least most of this book is solid and impressive scholarship view spoilerThere is much of interest in this book but I would like to mention a suggestive idea Beckwith proposes along with a few of the major building blocks of his point of view that provide a background for the proposed idea He explains why CECC cultures even when nomadic must rely on trade on commerce and argues that they relied on raiding only when outside influences crippled that commerce and why the intense trade along the Silk Road and the concomitant flourishing of the Central Asian and North Steppe economies manifested only when the CECC cultures were politically dominant and this dominance was waxing and waning in step with the waning and waxing of the peripheral empires At the end of the 2nd century CE both the Roman and Chinese empires began to crumble under internal pressures and under the external pressures of migrating nomads Beckwith suggests that the Central Asian and North Steppe economies had entered a significant contractive phase due to the expansion of the Roman and Chinese empires into their regions and the partial closing of the borders of both empires and that this depression and the internecine conflict that the expansive pressures of the peripheral empires were causing was the motivation for the migrations Hence in his words The aggressive foreign policy successes of the Chinese and Roman empires ultimately had disastrous conseuences that eventually brought about the collapse of both the Western Roman Empire and the Eastern Han Empire and with them the end of Classical civilization This is the first time I ve seen a proposed cause for the Great Migration in all other histories that have passed through my hands it is just a black box phenomenon peoples move but their reasons are unknown hide spoiler

Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

Download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Ing economy of premodern Central Eurasia the economy's disintegration following the region's partition by the Chinese and Russians in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the damaging of Central Eurasian culture by Modernism; and he discusses the significance for world history of the partial reemergence of Central Eurasian nations after the collapse of the Soviet Union Empires of the Silk Road places Central Eurasia within a world historical framework and demonstrates why the region is central to understanding the history of civilizati. Empires of the Silk Road is a scholarly well researched book on the history of Central Asia China Europe and the Far East As such this is perhaps the strongest criticism I have of the work namely that in purchasing it I was expecting a specialized study of Central Asia rather than Europe and China areas I have previously studiedIn defense of this possible inconsistency the histories of Central Asia Europe and China are remarkably intertwined especially when one considers the European invasions of Attila and the Mongol Conuests of the Middle Ages However a detailed history of the first and second world wars in the latter part of the book was somewhat unnecessary and perhaps attention could have been given to Central AsiaFor it s strengths though Empires of the Silk Road does break from conventional history in deconstructing stereotypes of Central Asian nomads particularly the Mongols portraying them not as barbarians a term the author deconstructs at great length toward the conclusion of the book but rather as traders like all other civilizations whose main purpose in conuest was to break down the barriers to trade an objective of most Empire builders throughout historyBeckwith offers great examples of how traditionally vilified conuerors such as Attila Genghis Khan and Tamerlane were no brutal than the subjects they conuered and no uncouth than what are considered the greater civilizations such as the ChineseThe main strengths of the book are the focus on the Mongol Conuests and later Tamerlane and the conclusion of the book offers a great insight into the cultural destruction of central Asian cultures in the 20th century namely the Tibetans and the Central Asian constituents of the former Soviet Union Within the conclusion Beckwith demonstrates an adept understanding of modernism and post modernism and analyzes art and culture with an interesting nostalgic bent which may be discerned by some to be bias but nonetheless offers a decent perspective on both art and cultureOn the whole there is much to be learned within this volume though those already versed in European and Chinese history may find the focus on these areas a little too familiar Nonetheless it is a book worth digesting in it s whole and complete form and the insight into Central Asia is there even if there are what some may consider to be unnecessary digressions


10 thoughts on “[E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

  1. says: Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download

    Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present A physical map of most of Eurasia This book is simply enormous in scope And so unhappily is this damn review For that rea

  2. says: Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Make no mistake this is an academic treatise Beckwith explains in his preface he intended to write an informed but readable essay for a general audience His goal was to minimize notes and avoid chronology yet his pedagogical instincts got the better of him The result is a book that a lay person can follow only with patience and commitment and the 320 page text extends to 480 pages He writes it has been said and the footnotes lea

  3. says: [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present I can’t remember what led me to this book I often read history but not generally sweeping histories like this which generally sacrifice depth for breadth All I know is that I picked it up and found myself hooked from the Preface

  4. says: [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Great Book I wont bother with a review because Razib wrote a very good one in 2009 See it here learned new things than i learn in most 500 page books The writing is occasionally clunky and you have to stop and figure out where you are someti

  5. says: Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download

    Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Late last year I picked this book up as it looked very interestingAnd it is I highly recommend it as an extremely well done history of a part of the world that most people just don't know about from pre history to the current dateBut—this book is not for the faint of heart If you want some light informative reading you will find t

  6. says: [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Although interesting at times this book is not uite what it sets itself out to be Rather than a history of Central Eurasia per se it is actually a history of ALL of Eurasia with a slight focus on the central bit spanning the bronze age to the p

  7. says: Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present I had the good fortune to discuss this book with one of the author's colleagues while I was reading it He informed me of two

  8. says: Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present

    Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download Empires of the Silk Road is a scholarly well researched book on the history of Central Asia China Europe and the Far East As such this is perhaps the strongest criticism I have of the work namely that in purchasing it I was expecting a specialized study of Central Asia rather than Europe and China areas I have previously studiedIn defense of this possible inconsistency the histories of Central Asia Europe and China are remarkably intertwi

  9. says: Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download

    Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Firstly I need to say that i am not a professional historian I have a great interest in this region simply because it constitutes a gap in my understanding of the history of the world Also there are not many books available in english to fill it This region is often treated as a part of Middle East which creates additional problems for any person intrested to know about Therefore this review is written from t

  10. says: Free download Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present Christopher I. Beckwith ç 5 Download Free download é PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ç Christopher I. Beckwith

    [E–book] Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present This is an excellent history not just another retelling The focus is on the history of the peoples of Central Eurasia and their interaction with the peripheral countries such as China and France The story starts far back in early prehistoric times with the proto indo europeans and comes up to the 21st century

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